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Author Topic: Arkansas Water Staking Options  (Read 924 times)
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Beaver
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« on: May 26, 2019, 06:31:32 AM »

Family and I enjoy staying on Lake Catherine.  I’ve called it our home away from home, although we haven’t been in over 2 years.   We even stayed there for Christmas one year. 

Obviously, there are going to be different soil types throughout the state, but how do y’all stake in the creeks when it’s Rocky, or are extensions about the only option? Jack Mountain was nearby, and you have to understand that where I come from, I can usually push a wolf fang 36” without a hammer so anchoring and stabilizing traps in rocky streams would be foreign to me



Also, how are y’all stabilizing 330s in rocky streams? Are you using 1-leg H-stands or relying on KB stabilizer type setups?


I am just curious how y’all handle the rocks.  I am not going to be Fur trapping in Arkansas.



« Last Edit: May 26, 2019, 08:22:42 PM by Beaver » Logged

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Roy Woods
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« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2019, 04:01:05 PM »

Welcome to Arkansas trapping, and the rocky problems that come with it.  Here are a few ways that I've tried working traps in the rocks.  One is the KB stabilizer which I have never used, but just got hold of one recently from a good friend.  Another way that I have used is to  attach a small conibear clip onto different sizes of cement blocks busted up to fit different water debts, and used them under banks, or on slids, etc.  These can also be used on large flat rocks that cover the whole creek bottom where the water is deep enough to work them in.  The most reliable way that I've found is to use drowning cables where the water is deep enough, and where you can tie them off to something on the bank.  You need to make sure that the weight on the drowning end of the wire is at least 40 plus pounds, and that the drowning wire has a one way sliding clip.   Another way is to use snares.  These can be worked in effectively in many places.  But you often need to look for a place to anchor the snare before you set it.  Hope this helps. 
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Beaver
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« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2019, 08:37:19 PM »

Thank you sir.  KBs are great, but I need to weld something to them so that I donít have to search for em after a catch.



Is it usually possible to drive a rebar stake in Arkansas creeks for deep end anchors, or are weighted drowners usually the only option? 






Thank you,
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Roy Woods
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« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2019, 08:52:01 PM »

Use a small loop of fine snare cable to make a two inch loop onto the KB stabilizer; then use a piece of # 14 wire that can be tied to a limb or onto the trap, either way would allow you to locate the stabilizer when the trap is sprung.  The snare wire loop has to go around both the cross member and the side bar.       
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Beaver
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« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2019, 11:16:15 AM »

Good idea, thank you.  I may very well go that route.




All of my extensions are connected to my BGs by using spring clips.  I was thinking I might weld a washer to the KBs, and then I would pass the extensionís spring clip through the washer and the trapís end swivel. 
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Roy Woods
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« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2019, 08:33:37 PM »

The welded washer is a good idea.  I don't have a welder, so have to improvise.  Good luck. 
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Beaver
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« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2019, 08:41:20 PM »

The welded washer is a good idea.  I don't have a welder, so have to improvise.  Good luck. 

You mentioned 14gauge wire...that stuff is incredibly useful ainít it?  I use it for everything from securing traps to tying up my cucumber trellis Unpossible

Trappers are some of the best at improvising.  One of my favorite things about learning from others is how they do things.

Iíve used an anvil, 4 lb hammer, and annealed nuts instead of welding for various reasons at times, and it works for a number of situations.  As a matter of fact, when I add a 3/4Ē nut to the bottom of KPs, deep drowner stakes, rebar drowners, and the tops of T-stakes for stakes and for rebar snare supports, I prefer smashing them instead of welding them. 
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If you can either quickly or quietly switch out shells, you can bring home almost anything.
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