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Author Topic: Baited beaver set  (Read 1751 times)
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Caseyb
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« on: December 22, 2017, 05:35:59 PM »

What's a good set .baited for beaver
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Trav821
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« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2017, 07:58:47 PM »

Not sure what your conditions are but in Nw they chew privet pretty hard, you'll find piles fairly often where they have set and whittled through a stack of lumber. You can drag some of the chews and the fresh cut greens up in a dip in the bank and foothold them or use a gripper in a run headed to a feed pile.
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Beaver
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« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2019, 02:13:32 PM »

I haven’t used baited sets very often, but I’ve had good results using willow and sweet gum baited sets. I cut pieces from thumb size to golf ball sized, take my knife and peel back some of the bark to make it a little easier to see.  They feed on those down here and they’re quite common so that’s what I’ve used. I’m pretty convinced theyre curious and will check out stuff that catches their eye.


Now I have done a good bit of what might be considered baiting (maybe luring?) and that’s to use raw honey at a set.  Critters plain like honey.  I don’t know if I’ve ever seen anyone mention using just honey, but I know there are people out there that do.  I consider it a change up if I need a trick other than a blind set and I don’t want to use anything with castor for whatever reason...


Something I think is worth mentioning is sometimes when I’m using a lure, if the location allows it and the situation calls for it, I make what is essentially a set which is a location they’d be likely to travel anyway, and some castor lure added upstream is more of an insurance policy.  A narrow tributary that feeds into the primary drainage comes to mind. The current will carry the scent downstream, and they’ll usually follow their nose right to it. This is a trick that I’m sure most beaver trappers know, but I thought I’d mention it for those that don’t. 

Good luck,
« Last Edit: July 01, 2019, 02:21:29 PM by Beaver » Logged

If you can either quickly or quietly switch out shells, you can bring home almost anything.
Roy Woods
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« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2019, 09:10:52 PM »

Something that I have used with good results are some foot long pieces of apple limbs about an inch in diameter.  Peel the bark on two or three for eye appeal and to release the sweet odor of the apple tree.  With these you don't need lure.  If you know a farmer that has apple trees you can trade some labor in trimming this winter for some good bait.   
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tired snareman
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« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2019, 10:48:09 PM »

I agree with most of the comments...
But I have found in warmer weather that much of the water -side vegies will turn dark in a few hour.
so for eye appeal ,I will split 2 or 3 sticks then stick em up behind the castor mound or green groceries
you cut up for beaver...the inside will stay white longer, I don t feel the BVR sees very well...
Dub
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« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2019, 03:54:42 PM »


Something that I have used with good results are some foot long pieces of apple limbs about an inch in diameter.  Peel the bark on two or three for eye appeal and to release the sweet odor of the apple tree.  With these you don't need lure.  If you know a farmer that has apple trees you can trade some labor in trimming this winter for some good bait.   


Tender apple limbs, now thereís a useful tip!






I agree with most of the comments...
But I have found in warmer weather that much of the water -side vegies will turn dark in a few hour.
so for eye appeal ,I will split 2 or 3 sticks then stick em up behind the castor mound or green groceries
you cut up for beaver...the inside will stay white longer, I don t feel the BVR sees very well...
Dub


I like that, and Iíll be trying it myself.  Thank you sir
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If you can either quickly or quietly switch out shells, you can bring home almost anything.
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